Hey Everyone,

Just a quick announcement, in an effort to come up with a self scoring contest, I came up with the ridiculously simple concept of robots firing lasers at each other in a fictional arena. Each robot controlled by a different PHP script, and a central arena managing it all.

It's basically a turn based game where your robots take turns for you. It's been rather popular around the office, and such so I thought I'd open it up to get more opinions and find more bugs.


It's not an official contest yet (no glittering prizes), but it will be one we get the bugs ironed out.

Please go take a look: Web Bot Battle!

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you may want to have a look at this, which is a similar concept but in ruby:

http://rrobots.rubyforge.org/

might give some inspiration.
#1 Ivo (Homepage) on 2008-07-31 21:14 (Reply)

crobots and jrobots (should be able to find them with google) are similar, but closer to "real time".

Anyway... a suggestion. Right now its cheaper to fire lots of shots than to scan - this is counter intuitive. I suggest either making scanning more cost effective or limiting your ability to fire to once per round (this to me seems best and makes more sense anyway)
#2 Anonymous on 2008-07-31 22:38 (Reply)

What about adding some contact information on the WBB page?

Also is there a chance to get the source of the arena to play^Wtest locally?
#3 Balu (Homepage) on 2008-07-31 22:42 (Reply)

Damn you for taking up more of my time!!
#4 Richard Thomas (Homepage) on 2008-08-01 00:22 (Reply)

Yes, scanning does consume more energy than firing, however it also gives you more details (from the distance and angle you can actually calculate the exact position of the remote bot) and you're able to obtain the position of the bot without it knowing that you've found it.

One of the bots i've written actually makes use of this advantage, firing and waiting for results rather than scanning.
#5 Paul Reinheimer (Homepage) on 2008-08-01 04:45 (Reply)

Back in my Java days (ie. before I saw the light and switched to PHP :-)) I spent countless hours programming Robocode bots (http://robocode.sourceforge.net/). The rules were pretty well thought out - I'm sure you could pinch one or two ideas without upsetting anybody too badly.
#6 James Gordon on 2008-08-01 06:31 (Reply)

Really cool idea!
#7 Evert (Homepage) on 2008-08-02 19:52 (Reply)

I definitely have to give this a shot sometime. I remember playing some Java-based code-a-robot-and-fight thing, which was actually realtime instead of turn-based.

There's also this game for PC called MindRover: The Europa Project where you build and "program" bots to compete and fight. Great game if you have the time to spend on fine-tuning your bot =)
#8 Jani Hartikainen (Homepage) on 2008-08-04 07:41 (Reply)


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Hi, I’m Paul Reinheimer, a developer working on the web.

I wrote a book titled Professional Web APIs with PHP back in 2006, and am currently working in Biomedical Informatics for a major public health company.

I’m working on a project to help developers called WonderProxy which has proxies all over the world. Working on GeoIP development? Now you can finally test properly! We've also released Global Ping Statistics for expected ping times between cities, as well as a Load Testing Tool to measure your site's ability to handle load. Our most recent site checking tool is Where's it Up? which checks your sites availability globally, returning HTTP, DNS, and Traceroute details

My hobbies are cycling, photography, travel, and engaging Allison Moore in intelligent discourse. I frequently write about PHP and other related technologies.

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